What is Long Term Equestrian Development?

LTED in Alberta Canada

Long Term Equestrian Development (LTED) is the equestrian model for maximizing an athlete’s potential at critical stages of cognitive, affective and psycho-motor skill set acquisition.

More simply, it’s providing the right coaching environment to facilitate learning throughout the active lifetime of the athlete. The model is practical, designed to direct programming needs of youthful beginners to seasoned competitors and includes needs of adult amateurs. The LTED or in other sports, the Long Term Athlete Development model is a cornerstone program that has been adopted by most, if not all, sports governing organizations in Canada.

Each demographic in every sport discipline has an optimum time frame for skill acquisition, physical and mental training, and competitive mileage. In equestrian sport, our equine partners are subject to the same considerations as human athletes. All groups of athletes, human and equine benefit from setting and achieving attainable goals within a coach supervised training plan. Using the LTED as a guideline for riding coaches encourages the implementation of sport science as it relates to the equestrian athlete.

The LTED Committee of the Alberta Equestrian Federation initiated, conferred and published a Long Term Equestrian Development booklet in 2016. Committee members began the process to align the the LTED model with services and programs offered through the AEF and Equestrian Canada. As a member of the committee and certified coach, I’m excited to see the possibilities of having a developmental model for coaches, instructors, riders and officials in Alberta.

More information on the LTED in Alberta can be found at http://www.albertaequestrian.com/programs

Long Term Athlete Development
LTED, Riding for the Long Term

Great Teams and Systems Build Success

I provide Dressage lessons to clients at Black Whiskey Ranch, Priddis,  Alberta. The western lilt of the barn’s name and that our regular clinician is regarded as one of the most renown hunter/jumper equitation coaches in Canada should peak your interest in our program.

We have a team and our team has a system, a program for developing skill sets for horse and rider. We practice correct aids and communication with our horses from Walk/Trot to Grand Prix.

I know this may sound simplistic, but without a basic system of understanding between horse and human, it is difficult to achieve a harmonious progression in Dressage.

I’m fortunate to be able to work with Chris Brand and reinforce the material presented in the bi-monthly clinics. It’s my job to keep the lesson program consistent and clients true to their journey between Chris’s  regular visits to Black Whiskey Ranch.

We are taking new clients in at this time. We work with jump riders to improve their skills over fences too. Call Bev 403-616-5771 for information on boarding your horse at our barn.

 

 

 

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I’m working with riders and horse out of Black Whiskey Ranch, Priddis Alberta. Don’t let the western lilt of the barn name fool you, or the fact that the resident clinician is hailed as one of the countries greatest hunter/jumper men and horse trainers. We at Black whiskey, are developing a consistent system of training horses and riders from Walk/trot through training Grand Prix level movements.

Chris Brand gives regular clinics. every two weeks, and I keep the lesson program moving forward with consistency, reinforcing the basics. This builds on the success of the regular clinics with Chris.

If you are looking for a team approach to help you achieve success in Dressage and Jumping, consider our barn, Black Whiskey Ranch, Priddis Alberta, 403-616-5771

 

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c.parentNode.insertBefore(cp, c); })(); </script><noscript>Powered by Cincopa <a href=’https://www.cincopa.com//media-platform/html-slideshow’>HTML Slideshow</a> for Business solution.<span>Clinics at Black Whiskey Ranch, Priddis AB</span><span>Images of Chris Brand teaching Dressage at Black Whiskey Ranch, with Kimberly Cox Competition Coach Specialist </span><span>Chris Brand Schooling Sonny</span><span>Lateral work for staightness and suppling the horse</span><span>flash</span><span> 24</span><span>cameramake</span><span> Apple</span><span>height</span><span> 2120</span><span>camerasoftware</span><span> 9.3.3</span><span>originaldate</span><span> 8/10/2016 5:18:38 PM</span><span>width</span><span> 1531</span><span>cameramodel</span><span> iPhone 5s</span><span>Long lining a young horse</span><span>Ground driving a young horse is an essential part of the system</span><span>flash</span><span> 24</span><span>cameramake</span><span> Apple</span><span>height</span><span> 1404</span><span>camerasoftware</span><span> 9.3.3</span><span>originaldate</span><span> 8/10/2016 8:02:28 PM</span><span>width</span><span> 937</span><span>cameramodel</span><span> iPhone 5s</span><span>Chris Brand in the tack</span><span>One of the few true horsemen in our area.</span><span>flash</span><span> 24</span><span>cameramake</span><span> Apple</span><span>height</span><span> 2233</span><span>camerasoftware</span><span> 9.3.3</span><span>originaldate</span><span> 8/10/2016 5:56:28 PM</span><span>width</span><span> 2092</span><span>cameramodel</span><span> iPhone 5s</span><span>Chris brand teaches a young rider</span><span>Great skills are progressive and systematic</span><span>flash</span><span> 24</span><span>cameramake</span><span> Apple</span><span>height</span><span> 2448</span><span>orientation</span><span> 1</span><span>camerasoftware</span><span> 9.3.3</span><span>originaldate</span><span> 8/10/2016 3:38:11 PM</span><span>width</span><span> 3264</span><span>cameramodel</span><span> iPhone 5s</span><span>Chris Brand works with Bev &amp; Neo</span><span>Adjusting the Rider’s leg position for canter work</span><span>flash</span><span> 32</span><span>cameramake</span><span> Apple</span><span>height</span><span> 960</span><span>orientation</span><span> 6</span><span>camerasoftware</span><span> 9.3.4</span><span>originaldate</span><span> 8/10/2016 3:09:26 PM</span><span>width</span><span> 720</span><span>cameramodel</span><span> iPad 2</span></noscript>

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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c.parentNode.insertBefore(cp, c); })(); </script><noscript>Powered by Cincopa <a href=’https://www.cincopa.com//media-platform/html-slideshow’>HTML Slideshow</a> for Business solution.<span>Clinics at Black Whiskey Ranch, Priddis AB</span><span>Images of Chris Brand teaching Dressage at Black Whiskey Ranch, with Kimberly Cox Competition Coach Specialist </span><span>Chris Brand Schooling Sonny</span><span>Lateral work for staightness and suppling the horse</span><span>flash</span><span> 24</span><span>cameramake</span><span> Apple</span><span>height</span><span> 2120</span><span>camerasoftware</span><span> 9.3.3</span><span>originaldate</span><span> 8/10/2016 5:18:38 PM</span><span>width</span><span> 1531</span><span>cameramodel</span><span> iPhone 5s</span><span>Long lining a young horse</span><span>Ground driving a young horse is an essential part of the system</span><span>flash</span><span> 24</span><span>cameramake</span><span> Apple</span><span>height</span><span> 1404</span><span>camerasoftware</span><span> 9.3.3</span><span>originaldate</span><span> 8/10/2016 8:02:28 PM</span><span>width</span><span> 937</span><span>cameramodel</span><span> iPhone 5s</span><span>Chris Brand in the tack</span><span>One of the few true horsemen in our area.</span><span>flash</span><span> 24</span><span>cameramake</span><span> Apple</span><span>height</span><span> 2233</span><span>camerasoftware</span><span> 9.3.3</span><span>originaldate</span><span> 8/10/2016 5:56:28 PM</span><span>width</span><span> 2092</span><span>cameramodel</span><span> iPhone 5s</span><span>Chris brand teaches a young rider</span><span>Great skills are progressive and systematic</span><span>flash</span><span> 24</span><span>cameramake</span><span> Apple</span><span>height</span><span> 2448</span><span>orientation</span><span> 1</span><span>camerasoftware</span><span> 9.3.3</span><span>originaldate</span><span> 8/10/2016 3:38:11 PM</span><span>width</span><span> 3264</span><span>cameramodel</span><span> iPhone 5s</span><span>Chris Brand works with Bev &amp; Neo</span><span>Adjusting the Rider’s leg position for canter work</span><span>flash</span><span> 32</span><span>cameramake</span><span> Apple</span><span>height</span><span> 960</span><span>orientation</span><span> 6</span><span>camerasoftware</span><span> 9.3.4</span><span>originaldate</span><span> 8/10/2016 3:09:26 PM</span><span>width</span><span> 720</span><span>cameramodel</span><span> iPad 2</span></noscript>

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kim Cox – Competition Coach Specialist Dressage

Kim Cox is awarded her Competition Coach Specialist Dressage through Equine Canada
Kim Cox is awarded her Competition Coach Specialist Dressage accreditation through Equine Canada

I am the first candidate in the province of Alberta, Canada to achieve my Competition Coach Specialist Dressage accreditation. This certification is backed by Equine Canada, the Coaching Association of Canada and administered by the Alberta Equestrian Federation.
The process involves reaching or exceeding all 7 certification outcomes to be mastered. Some of these outcomes are theory based and others are evaluated in person by expert evaluators chosen by Equine Canada. I was evaluated by Dale Irwin and Maureen Walters, both hailing from British Columbia.
My evaluators observed my preparation of a Fourth Level student at the recent CA/ADA Mardi Gras gold show to ride her test. The warm up evaluation includes both the horse and rider. The goal of the warm-up is to achieve suppleness and harmony in both. Some riders need to be pushed in the warm up and some need to be kept calm. Horses need to be ready and in a mind set to listen to the rider’s aids without distraction in a new and sometimes scary environment. The competition coach‘s job is to bring all the training and expertise together to maximize the performance. The coach takes care of all the logistics, making sure the rider is kept free of pre-test distractions and can offer 100% attention on the task at hand. Keeping tabs on contingencies, hydration breaks, medications (asthma), timing of the warm-up and checking with the ring-steward for the order of go are all part of the pre-performance requirements. This is all part of outcome 6, “Supporting the Competitive Experience”.
Hopefully all the pre-test warm-up and training has led to a successful test. I was so very pleased with my student and her horse. This was her debut at Fourth Level and as one of the evaluators exclaimed, “She has launched”. That being said, even a less stellar test has its merits from a learning perspective. This leads to the coach being able to logically debrief the athlete and comment knowledgeably and complete Outcome 3 – Analyze Performance.
After the competition piece of my evaluation, we reconvened the same evening at the facility where I coach. The evaluators were to view Outcome 2 – Support Athletes in Training. I prepared and taught 4 different lessons to 4 horse/rider combinations on topics chosen from the Competition Coach Specialist Dressage protocol. One lesson involves correctly and safely teaching a student to improve the horse through lunging. The other lessons topics I chose were improving the half halt, exercises to improve the half-pass and riding 10m circles.
The evaluators asked me to switch my lesson focus in situ, to improve a rider’s equitation. A good coach can think on her feet, and the evaluators were asking me to show adaptive management. This happens in training lessons frequently. A coach may have a plan, but a horse and rider can enter into a training session with some issue that needs to be addressed before moving forward.
Planning for all training of horses and riders in my care are part of Outcomes 4 and 5, Designing and Managing an Equestrian Sports Program. All equine and human athletes are on a time line of progress. The riders are classified as to their LTED (Long Term Equestrian Development) level and the horses are progressing along the Scale of Training. Improvement in dressage is not linear, nor constant. Coaching identifies areas in both athletes that need remediation and develops exercises that benefits both. YTP (Year Training Plan) is a flexible model that accommodates strengths and weaknesses in athletes. It also includes augmented training, such as weight training, Pilates, yoga and other modalities to improve rider fitness. Horses are also on a competition program of enhanced equine health, including dental and veterinary care, massage, chiropractic adjustments, saddle fit and farriery. The YTP is a time line divided into phases in the competition year, with attention to rest and recovery cycles for both horse and rider. The YTP is part of the written work submitted to the evaluators before the practical examination.
I feel my tenure as a Physical Education Teacher and High School Coach helped me formulate successful year training plans for riders. As an athlete, I can appreciate the importance of planning for progress, and as an equestrian I know what it takes to bring a horse along in training. The end result is a harmonious relationship between horse and rider.

CalgaryDressage.com…2014 resolutions for the New Year

Usually there are many things that come to mind when making New Years resolutions. I am choosing to keep it simple this year.

Stay neutral, open and observant in each ride. That’s my mantra for 2014.

I have gone through stages focusing  on technique, and micro-management.

I must now let my horse do his job.

I can be there for him when he needs me, but I cannot carry him.

I cannot focus on perfection only strive for it.

By staying neutral and observant I can improve my feel.

I’ve noticed a certain impatience to my warm up.

My expectations of how long it should take to get ready to work  have no impact on the horse’s readiness.

Patientce is a virtue…so I will choose to stay open and neutral.

I’ll ride correctly and let the patterns and exercises work for me and my horse. I realize that some things you  can’t hurry.

The virtue is in the comming together of the horse in a good frame on his own. I’v been guilty of “framing” the horse….before he was ready to yield.  I think it now better to ride an extra 15 minutes or so and have the horse come into you.

I also realize that having a talented horse that may give you 20% effort on any day must be asked to perform, demanding his attention leads to resistance. Some horses must be brought into work with more finesse, I will try to be more open to that.

The neutrality means not to judge the horse as lazy or unwilling to give over the back. I think some horses need convincing that the work will be fun and challenging. I believe giving the horse something to look at or something to ride over (cavalletti) may stimulate him and improve his work ethic. I enjoy fun new things and challenges, why not our horses.

Observant means not to overface or  overstimulate…there is a balance of what is fun and what is scary…don’t judge…be observant and creative in problem solving. A good observer can monitor feedback from the horse more effectively. Good riding is working through that infinite feedback loop.

I hope you find my musings interesting.

Happy New Year…from Kimberly Cox and Roderick

Here’s to a great 2014 full of hope, success and growth through CalgaryDressage.com

 

CalgaryDressage.com…The Positive Equestrian’s Pledge

The focus of attending the recent Petro-Canada Sport Leadership Conference held in Calgary November 7th through 9th was the power of maintaining a positive team focus.

Dressage is an individdual sport, but the barn you train at fosters a team.

The  group of experts you work wlith to better yourself and your horse is a team, if you are a sponsored rider, you are part of a team, you and your horse are a team.

The relevance of a positive team environment in sport is measurable success. The cost of even one negative team member is so great, it can and will sink even the grandest ship of confidence. This is fact.

If there is one negative person at  your side, subversion occurs.

It doesn’t mean everyone has to walk around with false smilles and be happy happy. Most of us who ride and compete in dressage are in a mature demagraphic and know when we hear negative barn talk, explicitly or inferred about another trainer, coach, rider, horse, farrier…etc.

Be a “fly on the wall” at the barn and take notice of the comments made and heard.  Notice who on your team is positive and who may need a tuning in. The head coach at a facility would be the likely candidate to discuss the negativity with the team member privately.  In most instances the negative person may not even realize the potential impact of the discourse.  If there is a question or conflict at a barn there needs to be a clear path of communication directed at the authority with the power to act on the situation.  That’s not negativity, that’s good business.  It’s the sly comments, or inferred remarks of general negativity that cause teams to fail.  Be mindfull in your speech…by all means “say what you mean and mean what you say” and direct any questions or concerns to the right people.

Be proactive, positive and bring your best to the barn. Your horses and your training deserve it.

Jon Gordon presented a “Positive Team Pledge” during his keynote address to the crowd of elite coaches and administrators.  I have modified its contents to fit equestrian sport:

The Positive Equestrian’s Pledge

I pledge to be a positive leader who sets the example for other equestrians through my positive energy and actions.

I promise to share positive energy and encouragement within equestrian sport

I will not be an energy vampire nor will I sabotage myself and my horse with negativity, complaining and excuses.

When I make a mistake I will own it and seek to improve.

When I’m not riding well I will stay positive and strive to get better.

When I experience self-doubt I will remember a time when I succeeded.

When I feel fear I will choose faith.

When I face adversity I will find strength.

When we experience a defeat I will choose to stay positive andd prepare to achieve another victory.

With hard work, determination and faith, I will never give up and will always help my horse forward towards our vision and goals.

Today and every day I will be positive and strive to make a positive impact in our sport.

Jon Gordon is a motivational speaker and has made his success by building winning teams in professional sports.

 

 

CalgaryDressage.com…Roderick August 11, 2013

Roderick West Calgary Dressage Third Level Test 3 64%

Ride more forward into a steady hand. Why does it take so long to get there? I have a compulsive need to fix things as they happen. My coach, Deanna Cullen, has steadfastly resolved to not allow my disfunctionality to “fiddle” with the reins.

Roderick, my long suffering partner, has much to teach me yet.  Bless our horses and our children,  for they are the consumate teacher.

Your in good riding,

Kim

CalgaryDressage.com…..Tools for success in the Dressage Court

CalgaryDressage pictures
Showing in Del Mar

The Digital Horse visual aid for learning dresage tests.

I ‘ve found it is better to learn all my dressage tests by memory.  It goes beyond memory, I learn them “by heart”.  In this way I use my anticipation and sequencing skills to help prepare for the next movement.

If there is soft music in the background of our ride I use it to “dance” to with my horse.  If there is no music I ride with a tune in my head.  When I studied dance at Uot C years ago, no one would talk us through the moves from the curtain, in gymnastics you need to remember your floor routine or you couldn’t sequence your tumbling lines, one portion of the routine flowed and built on the next.

I have been in the trenches of training level and I know nerves can play interference with memory. Have a reader if you must to keep yourself secure. I urge all of my riders to know their tests upside douwn and backwards.  Practice a sequence of 2 or 3 moves at a time untill they flow.  Dance with your horse.

Another way to learn your tests is to draw them out on a dressage court template.  This method suits visusal learners best.  Riders can visualize where the next transition takes place.  You make a dressage map for your test.  Advanced riders can add in half halts or what “feel” they should experience at each transition. Preparation points are critical, for example you can’t wait to get to a letter before asking to start a circle, shoulder in or half pass.

Good luck with this, see you at the shows.

Kim

 

 

 

CalgaryDressage.com…Dressage Code of Conduct

Dressage Code
Patience, Practice, Trust

Dressage Code:

Understand the results you achieve in training are only a step in the process.

Let your horse be the primary source of instant feedback for your purpose and progress.

Focus on joy, celebration and an inner sense of calm purposeful determination.

Know that each result achieved correctly will occur perfectly on purpose.

Prepare to acknowledge what is. Emphasize your appreciation of your horse and what it can do.

Complaints are shared only with someone who can initiate change.

Yours in good riding,

Kim Cox

 

CalgaryDressage.com….Barn Affirmations

Be thankful
As you enter the barn…

Here are personal affirmations I use as I go to train at the barn: I accept myself and my horse for who we are today. I have a warm regard for others at the barn. I am ready, present physically, emotionaly, mentally and spiritually. I will assist others whenever I can, without taking away from their self detrmination.I believe in win/win and give for the love of giving. Abundance is the natural state of the universe. Believe it.  Ask and allow. Grooming is a silent time to focus on and communicate with your horse.This is part of the ritual of preparation for a successful ride.

Yours in good riding,

Kim